Skip to content
Chobi Mela — an unwavering lens on injustice

Written by Rachel Spence 

 

Decorated with murals of children at play and sailing boats, the schoolyard feels peaceful. The tree trunks that surge out of the dusty ground look as if they have been there for centuries. The wooden chairs stand in neat rows, empty of sitters, only the distance between them telling us that this will be, or perhaps was, a gathering in the era of pandemic. We think of photography as a way to immortalise an event. But the picture of the chairs is a chronicle of absence. A quiet, crystalline testament to people who aren’t there, it is a subtle elegy for a year in which loss has become the common currency of millions.

 

We think of photography as a way to immortalise an event. But the picture of the chairs is a chronicle of absence. A quiet, crystalline testament to people who aren’t there, it is a subtle elegy for a year in which loss has become the common currency of millions.